Project #8

in The Original 52 Projects

Make a poster. It can be sized however you want, but 8.5 X 11 is easiest to copy and post. In terms of what should be on your poster, that’s wide open. The poster can be political, it can promote something you need to get the word out about, it can feature your art, or it can just be something that looks cool and is totally nonsensical. Anything.

Once your poster is done, post it all over. You can post it all over a room, an office, a building, a school, a campus, a town, a city, a state, a nation, the world.

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During student council elections in my senior year at high school, someone postered the school with scandalous posters. These suckers weren’t just put up with tape and tacks. These posters were sealed on with glue. And they were everywhere.

The posters — all featuring various people running for office — contained crudely drawn characters doing crude things, and the comments were even harsher. So of course everyone thought they were the funniest thing ever.

“Don’t vote for Mike, he sucks dick.”

Or

“Don’t vote for Susan, she’s a brown noser.”

And all the pictures — a notch above stick figure drawings — were literal depictions of the comments.

The striking thing was how these posters took aim at all the popular kids, the ones who always seem to get all the glory, and get good grades as well — you know, the kids who end up on student council. Everything always seems to go right for these popular kids – they’ve got the best clothes, they’re good at sports, they have shiny new cars, they run with the best looking crowd, and they always have the best looking girlfriends or boyfriends.

The people running for office that actually deserved to win but probably wouldn’t were not featured in any of the posters.

So these posters were an attack on the high school hierarchy. And there was indeed some subtle ground-leveling that took place on that day.

“Did you see the one with the …?”

“These things are everywhere!”

“Oh man, this is great!”

And of course, the main focus: “Who do you think did it?”

Usually in situations like this, the person who does the job ends up telling people, or maybe just one person. Then that person tells someone, and that person tells someone, and before you know it, the kid who did the job is sitting in the principal’s office waiting for his parents to come pick him up. Busted.

But the person who postered the school must never have told anyone. No one was ever caught, and we never did find out who put up those posters.

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